Read The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald Online

The Great Gatsby

Here is a novel, glamorous, ironical, compassionate a marvelous fusion into unity of the curious incongruities of the life of the period which reveals a hero like no other one who could live at no other time and in no other place. But he will live as a character, we surmise, as long as the memory of any reader lasts.It is the story of this Jay Gatsby who came so mysteriously to West Egg, of his sumptuous entertainments, and of his love for Daisy Buchanan a story that ranges from pure lyrical beauty to sheer brutal realism, and is infused with a sense of the strangeness of human circumstance in a heedless universe.It is a magical, living book, blended of irony, romance, and mysticism.--back cover (first edition)...

Title : The Great Gatsby
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ISBN : 9780743273565
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 180 pages
Url Type : Home » Download » The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby Wikipedia The Great Gatsby is a novel written by American author F Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West and East Egg on The Great Gatsby IMDb Directed by Baz Luhrmann With Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan, Joel Edgerton, Tobey Maguire A writer and wall street trader, Nick, finds himself drawn to the past The Great Gatsby IMDb Directed by Jack Clayton With Robert Redford, Mia Farrow, Bruce Dern, Karen Black A Midwesterner becomes fascinated with his nouveau riche neighbor, who obsesses The Great Gatsby Warner Bros Movies The Great Gatsby follows Fitzgerald like, would be writer Nick Carraway Tobey Maguire as he leaves the Midwest and comes to New York City in the spring of , an SparkNotes The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby SparkNotes Literature Guide Series Shop Now The Great Gatsby For Nes The Great Gatsby For the Nintendo Entertainment System. The Great Gatsby film Wikipedia The Great Gatsby is a American romantic drama film based on F Scott Fitzgerald s novel of the same name It was directed by The Great Gatsby Study Guide GradeSaver The Great Gatsby, published in , is widely considered to be F Scott Fitzergerald s greatest novel It is also considered a seminal work on the fallibility of the Party like Gatsby Official The event series Party like Gatsby was inspired by the world famous novel The Great Gatsby written by the American author F Scott Fitzgerald in . The Great Gatsby Rotten Tomatoes The Great Gatsby follows Fitzgerald like, would be writer Nick Carraway Tobey Maguire as he leaves the Midwest and comes to New York City in the spring of

The Great Gatsby Reviews

  • Brian Yahn

    Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan are two of the most memorable characters in literature. F. Scott Fitzgerald weaves them tragically together in this perfectly plotted masterpiece.

    Every scene is unforgettable--so distinct and unique--from the grandest party ever recorded, to the most tense fight ever written, to the most perfectly dark twisted love affair of all time, to the most pathetically sad funeral imaginable.

    When people say this is the best book ever written, they're not kidding. It's so good
    ...more

  • Sarah

    “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And then one fine morning—

    So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past”

  • Henry Avila

    Jay Gatsby, is a mysterious young man, who gives extravagant parties on Long Island, New York, outside his palatial mansion , in the warm, lazy, summer nights. That he doesn't know the people he invites, not to mention the numerous gatecrashers, might make it a little strange, but this being the roaring 20's, anything goes, rumors abound about Gatsby, bootlegger ? Who cares, as long as the free liquor flows, the great food served, and the beautiful music, continues playing. Finally attending one ...more

  • Stephen



    Casual, self-absorbed decadence, the evaporation of social grace, money calling all the shots and memories of the past holding people hostage from the future that lies before them. Yes, Mr. Fitzgerald has nailed it and written one of THE great American novels.

    This book was a surprise. I LOVED it and all of the deep contradictions swimming around its heart. At once a scathing indictment on the erosion of the American Dream, but also a bittersweet love letter to the unfailing optimism of the Ame

    They were careless people, Tom and Daisy--they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.
    In addition, we have Jordan Baker who is a poster child for the pretty, amoral, self-centered rich girl whose view of the world is jaded and unsentimental. Basically, she’s a bitch.

    The most intriguing character by far is Jay Gatsby himself, both for who he is and for how Fitzgerald develops him through the course of the narrative. When we are first introduced to Gatsby, he comes across as a polite, gracious, well-mannered gentleman with a magnetic personality who our narrator takes to immediately.
    He had one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced, or seemed to face, the whole external world for an instant and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself.
    However, from that very first encounter, Fitzgerald slowly chips away at the persona and peels back the layers of the “Great” Gatsby until we are left with a flawed and deeply tragic figure that in my opinion ranks among the most memorable in all of classic literature. Nick’s journey in his relationship with Gatsby mirrors our own. “It is invariably saddening to look through new eyes at things upon which you have expended your own powers of adjustment.”

    Through a series of parties, affairs, beatings, drunken escapades, the lives of the characters intermesh with terrible consequences. I don’t want to give away major parts of the story as I think they are best experienced for the first time fresh, but at the heart of Fitzgerald’s morality tale is a tragic love that for me rivaled the emotional devastation I felt at the doomed relationship of Heathcliff and Catherine in Wuthering Heights. In general, Fitzgerald’s world of excessive jubilance and debauchery is a mask that the characters wear to avoid the quiet torments that haunt them whenever they are forced to take stock of their actions. Rather than do this, they simply keep moving. "I felt a haunting loneliness sometimes, and felt it in others--young clerks in the dusk, wasting the most poignant moments of night and life."

    In the end, Fitzgerald manages the amazing feat of creating a sad, bleak portrait of America while maintaining a sense of restrained optimism in the future. Both heart-wrenching and strangely comforting at the same time. I guess in the end, this was a book that made me feel a lot and that is all I can ever ask. I’m going to wrap this up with my second favorite quote from the book (my favorite being the one at the very beginning of the review):
    And as I sat there, brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby's wonder when he first picked out Daisy's light at the end of his dock. He had come such a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close he could hardly fail to grasp it. But what he did not know was that it was already behind him, somewhere in the vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.
    5.0 stars. HIGHEST POSSIBLE RECOMMENDATION!!

    ...more

  • Pollopicu

    This is my least-favorite classic of all time. Probably even my least favorite book, ever.

    I didn't have the faintest iota of interest in neither era nor lifestyle of the people in this novela. So why did I read it to begin with? well, because I wanted to give it a chance. I've been surprised by many books, many a times. Thought this could open a new literary door for me.

    Most of the novel was incomprehensibly lame. I was never fully introduced to the root of the affair that existed between Gatsb

    “They’re such beautiful shirts,” she sobbed.… “It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such—such beautiful shirts before.”
    ...sob..sob.. boo-hoo-hoo. oh Please someone shut her the fuck up. ...more

  • Nataliya



    Oh Gatsby, you old sport, you poor semi-delusionally hopeful dreamer with 'some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life', focusing your whole self and soul on that elusive money-colored green light - a dream that shatters just when you are *this* close to it.



    Jay Gatsby, who dreamed a dream with the passion and courage few possess - and the tragedy was that it was a wrong dream colliding with reality that was even more wrong - and deadly.

    Just like the Great Houdini - the association the

    'Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter — to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther... And one fine morning ——

    So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.'
    Dear Gatsby, not everything I liked back when I was fourteen has withstood the test of time¹ - but you clearly did, and as I get older, closer to your and Nick Carraway's age, your story gathers more dimensions and more tragedy, fleshing out so much more from what I thought of as a tragic love story when I was a child - turning into a great American tragedy.
    ¹ I hang my head in shame at my ability to still belt out an enthusiastic (albeit poorly rendered) version of '...Baby One More Time' when it comes on the radio (provided, of course, that my car windows are safely up).

    I blame it on my residual teenage hormones.


    Jay Gatsby, you barged head-on to achieve and conquer your American dream, not stopping until your dreams became your reality, until you reinvented yourself with the dizzying strength of your belief. Your tragedy was that you equated your dream with money, and money with happiness and love. And honestly, given the messed up world we live in, you were not that far from getting everything you thought you wanted, including the kind of love that hinges on the green dollar signs.

    And you *almost* saw it, you poor bastard, but in the end you chose to let your delusion continue, you poor soul.

    Poor Gatsby! Yours is the story of a young man who suddenly rose to wealth and fame, running like a hamster on the wheel amassing wealth for the sake of love, for the sake of winning the heart of a Southern belle, the one whose 'voice is full of money' - in a book written by a young man who suddenly rose to wealth and fame, desperately running on the hamster wheel of 'high life' to win the heart of his own Southern belle. Poor Gatsby, and poor F. Scott Fitzgerald - the guy who so brilliantly described it all, but who continued to live the life his character failed to see for what it was.



    The Great Gatsby is a story about the lavish excesses meant to serve every little whim of the rich and wannabe-rich in the splendid but unsatisfying in their shallow emptiness glitzy and gaudy post-war years, and the resulting suffocation under the uselessness and unexpected oppressiveness of elusive American dream in the time when money was plenty and the alluring seemingly dream life was just around the corner, just within reach.

    But first and foremost, it is a story of disillusionment with dreams that prove to be shallow and unworthy of the dreamer - while at the same time firmly hanging on to the idea of the dream, the ability to dream big, and the stubborn tenacity of the dreamer, 'an extraordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again' .



    This is why Gatsby is still so relevant in the world we live in - almost a hundred years after Fitzgerald wrote it in the Roaring Twenties - the present-day world that still worships money and views it as a substitute for the American dream, the world that hinges on materialism, the world that no longer frowns on the gaudiness and glitz of the nouveau riche.

    In this world Jay Gatsby, poor old sport, with his huge tasteless mansion and lavish tasteless parties and in-your-face tasteless car and tasteless pink suit would be, perhaps, quietly sniggered at - but would have fit in without the need for aristocratic breeding - who cares if he has the money and the ability to throw parties worthy of reality show fame???



    Because in the present world just the fact of having heaps of money makes you worthy - and therefore the people whose 'voices are full of money', who are 'gleaming like silver, safe and proud above the hot struggles of the poor', people who genuinely believe that money makes them worthy and invincible are all too common. Tom and Daisy Buchanan would be proud of them.

    And wannabe Gatsbys pour their capacity to dream into chasing the shallow dream of dollar signs, nothing more.
    'They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.'


    This book somehow hit the right note back when I read it when I was fourteen, and hit even truer note now, deeply resonating with me a decade short of a hundred years since it was written. If you read it for school years ago, I ask you to pick it up and give its pages another look - and it may amaze you.

    Five green-light stars in the fog at the end of a dock. ...more

  • karen



    i love this book. yes, it is a story about vapid and shallow people who live selfish and hedonistic lives and treat other people like playthings, but there is an elegance, a restraint to the prose that manages to discuss, in the same tone, both doomed love and the breakdown of the american dream. and it is masterful. some may say the great american novel.

    and so this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OULhla...

    makes me want to tear my eyes out with my hands and stomp on them forever and ever.

    yeah, yo
    ...more

  • Marina

    Great.

    Now I'm getting pissed off at classics too. I seem to be upping my game.

    How much shallowness can one person stand.

    Well, if I feel betrayed, imagine Jay.





    Newsflash sweetheart, when a man wants to give you the world, the least you can do is send a flower to his funeral.



    I suppose he would have had you not destroyed him.



    I've never respected a fictional character more.



    And the best part is that now, we don't even have the excuse of a battle between the old wealth and the new rich of the 1920s. Th
    ...more