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The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats

The true adventures of David Fairchild, a late-nineteenth-century food explorer who traveled the globe and introduced diverse crops like avocados, mangoes, seedless grapes--and thousands more--to the American plate.In the nineteenth century, American meals were about subsistence, not enjoyment. But as a new century approached, appetites broadened, and David Fairchild, a young botanist with an insatiable lust to explore and experience the world, set out in search of foods that would enrich the American farmer and enchant the American eater.Kale from Croatia, mangoes from India, and hops from Bavaria. Peaches from China, avocados from Chile, and pomegranates from Malta. Fairchild's finds weren't just limited to food: From Egypt he sent back a variety of cotton that revolutionized an industry, and via Japan he introduced the cherry blossom tree, forever brightening America's capital. Along the way, he was arrested, caught diseases, and bargained with island tribes. But his culinary ambition came during a formative era, and through him, America transformed into the most diverse food system ever created....

Title : The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats
Author :
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ISBN : 9781101990582
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 416 pages
Url Type : Home » Download » The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats

Cherry Blossoms in Washington DC Almost a Diplomacy America s capital was badly in need of a makeover at the turn of the th century, particularly as Teddy Roosevelt s new presidency brought youthful excitement to National Geographic Magazine National Geographic stories take you on a journey that s always enlightening, often surprising, and unfailingly fascinating. We would like to show you a description here but the site won t allow us. Port Manteaux Word Maker OneLook Port Manteaux churns out silly new words when you feed it an idea or two Enter a word or two above and you ll get back a bunch of portmanteaux created by jamming Spinifex and Sand Project Gutenberg Australia SPINIFEX AND SAND A Narrative of Five Years Pioneering and Exploration in Western Ausralia By The HON DAVID W CARNEGIE Illustration

The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats Reviews

  • Dan Russell

    Here is the story of David Fairchild, a Victorian gentleman who had an urge for adventure, and accidentally met up with Barbour Lathrop, a rich Victorian gentleman with a wanderlust and a need to be recognized. Together, with Lathrop funding Fairchild and providing encouragement (along a never-ending need to be idolized), they went around the world in search of new crops for American farmers to grow for market.

    Most surprisingly, Fairchild found plants that we take for granted. It was Fairchild
    ...more

  • Nancy

    Very interesting book about the foods we eat. I guess I'd never given much thought to the fact that before the Gilded Age, Americans didn't enjoy a wide variety of foods. I now understand why my grandmother's date cake recipe was such a hit--dates were a recent addition to the palate of most! Fast-moving and easy to read.

  • Bandit

    Just about every time you eat a fruit, vegetable or just something exciting that came from the earth, not was killed for you or by you, you have David Fairchild to thank. And no one even knows about him or at least not enough and I’m so glad there’s now this book to educate and finally give credit where credit’s due. For any discriminate palate, every vegetarian, anyone who likes or loves food, David Fairchild is The Man. Tirelessly traveling the globe and collecting fruits and vegetables (and t ...more

  • Rosamond van der Linde

    Fabulous food

    Amazing adventures of a man whom I met as a child. David Fairchild and I planted an avacado tree on the Kampong! I heard tales from David. This book fascinAted me since some of the tales I had heard directly from this exceedingly well traveled,gentle man. I have never tried a mangosteen!

  • Chris

    Informative and fascinating. I grew up a mile from David Fairchild’s estate, “In the Woods,” in North Chevy Chase and had not heard of him or the estate. If you enjoy stories of English eccentric explorers then you will enjoy this tale of American plant nerds and eccentrics. Although the book is about Fairchild and his stewardship of food exploration we meet many interesting characters who deserve books in their own right: foremost among them being Frank Meyer for whom the lemon is named; Barbou ...more

  • Richard Reese

    Cue up the marching band, majorettes, flag-waving veterans, and cheering crowds. The Food Explorer by Daniel Stone is a proud celebration of American greatness. The hero of the story is David Fairchild (1869–1954), a botanist and agricultural explorer. Working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, his group was responsible for sending home seeds and cuttings of thousands of plants from nations around the world. The goal was to expand the variety of crops grown in America, and build the biggest ...more

  • Renee Nash

    Book Description

    The true adventures of David Fairchild, a late-nineteenth-century food explorer who traveled the globe and introduced diverse crops like avocados, mangoes, seedless grapes--and thousands more--to the American plate.

    My Thoughts

    In the 19th century, preparing meals and eating was solely viewed as necessary for survival. People didn't go on culinary adventures or look for exotic ingredients to create flavor combinations to delight the palate. Enter David Fairchild, a botanist who tra
    ...more

  • Benjamin

    I should have enjoyed this;I wanted to, but couldn't.

    The narrative pace didn't appeal to me. It would jump ahead to tell part of the story in depth, then revert back in time just to slog along trying to catch up before repeating the cycle again. I also felt there were too many side stories. Fairchild's work is interesting enough, touching on many political, ethical, and ecological issues, why do I care about the life of his wealthy benefactor?

    Jumping ahead trying to keep interest, it seems that
    ...more